House & Home 

Exhibit June 18 – August 9

special programs July 12 & 14

NEH On-the-Road Exhibition created by The National Building Museum, Washington, DC, in partnership with Mid-America Arts Alliance
Curated by Sarah Levitt, Curator, The National Building Museum

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at the National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to “be at home” have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, “please touch” interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words “house” and “home.” The exhibition also showcases domestic objects–from cooking utensils to telephones–and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th Century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nationwide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation, House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

“Our Neighborhood”

July 12, 2018, 6PM

Florence Indian Mound Museum
Join us for a panel discussion about what makes a neighborhood and how we connect to each other with old and new communities. Panelists are:
Mary Shell, Alabama Historic Commission
Melissa Bailey, director of planning and development for City of Florence
Jason Fondren from KPS Group

“Our House”

July 14, 2018, 1PM – 3PM

Florence-Lauderdale Public Library 
We invite families to sign up to create a scrap book for “Our House.” Families will pre-register for this event at the Florence-Lauderdale Public Library beginning June 14 and receive a packet to complete before the scrap booking session. Time will be allowed for sharing the stories of our homes at the end of the session. 
 

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